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I travel, take photos, and build digital things.
I'm building SelfieIM. I curate Food & History.
I live in San Francisco, where the land ends.

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Tech

Alaric and I started SelfieIM a few months ago as a fun little experiment. We’ve been blown away by the response. It’s now a fun daily habit for so many dedicated people around the world.

What’s next? Oh man, I am excited! It is the biggest idea we’ve ever had. 

Soooooon.

selfieim:

Users trying your app is easy. Engagement is hard. What growth looks like on SelfieIM since the beginning of the year. :D

"Things I learned from Tumblr." It’s a nice validation from our user base, and I’m particularly excited about the stuff we’re experimenting with; hope our users get to play with it soon.

selfieim:

Users trying your app is easy. Engagement is hard. What growth looks like on SelfieIM since the beginning of the year. :D

"Things I learned from Tumblr." It’s a nice validation from our user base, and I’m particularly excited about the stuff we’re experimenting with; hope our users get to play with it soon.

I love selfies because they give me the opportunity to put faces to the screen names of so many people who’ve communicated with me over the years — and not just one face, in a thoughtfully-framed, posed photograph taken by someone else, but a range of expressions captured in private moments, as the taker wants to be seen.

LEAVE SELFIES ALONE | xoJane

:) It’s why we love selfies, too.

(via selfieim)

selfieim:

We’re honored to be in the NY Times Sunday Style section this weekend. Selfies are often misunderstood, as are most new ways of doing things.

If you track the forms of Internet communication over time, from IM to email to emoticons to SMS, then perhaps the emotive selfie is simply the currency of communication for a new generation, and an increasingly valuable one as face-to-face communication becomes rare.


Look ma! The New York Times!

selfieim:

We’re honored to be in the NY Times Sunday Style section this weekend. Selfies are often misunderstood, as are most new ways of doing things.

If you track the forms of Internet communication over time, from IM to email to emoticons to SMS, then perhaps the emotive selfie is simply the currency of communication for a new generation, and an increasingly valuable one as face-to-face communication becomes rare.

Look ma! The New York Times!

Amid the bared midsections and flawless smiles flashed all so often on the screen comes the explosion of the ugly selfie, a sliver of authenticity in an otherwise filtered medium. Take a tour through Selfie.im, the adolescent-dominated selfie-sharing app for the iPhone, and you won’t find pouted lips but close-up shots of double chins, insides of mouths, makeup-less pores, exaggerated toothy growls and duck lips zoomed in so close that they look grotesque.

With Some Selfies, the Uglier the Better - NYTimes.com

Thanks for the mention, NYTimes. Although in our opinion — there are no ‘ugly’ selfies. There’s showing off and there’s being authentic.

SelfieIM - authenticity :)

So It’s quite possible mobile social will have lots of services indefinitely. This creates opportunities, but also a pretty basic challenge to Facebook. Partly in response, it paid first 1% of its market value for Instagram and now close to 10% for WhatsApp, taking not dominance but at the least two of the commanding heights of mobile social. That’s the right way to think about value, I think - not ‘OMG $16bn!”, but “is this worth 10% of Facebook?’ The deal values WhatsApp users at $35 each (very close to what Google paid for YouTube, incidentally), but the current market cap of Facebook values its MAUs at $140 or so.

Whatsapp and $19bn — Benedict Evans

Many many smart people already read Benedict Evan’s take on mobile stuff. His analysis of WhatsApp is a good reminder for me about the meaning of innovation - and for all the business and finance speak, that’s what Benedict talks about the most: the value of innovation.

And when I think about the financials of tech, what founders get on exit is one of the least interesting bits — it’s much more interesting to consider what the product — how people are using it, how often they come back, how they will use it in the future — is worth to companies that think in the future tense. In many cases, breaking it down to value per user gets closer to the point than the overall price tag.

Tagged: #tech
selfieim:

fastcodesign:

Russians Are Miserable And Brazilians Love To Smile: What Selfies Reveal About Cultural Stereotypes
"Selfies are an interesting thing to study right now. Are they just a fad, or do they represent a substantial new trend of how we create and share photos? Are they a means of self-expression, a tool of self-promotion, or a cry for attention? And are there any cultural differences in the way people in different countries take selfies?"

We’d like to think that self-expression is the baseline. They can be used for so much more, based on what we’ve seen in the last few months of experimentation.

Selfies = building blocks.

selfieim:

fastcodesign:

Russians Are Miserable And Brazilians Love To Smile: What Selfies Reveal About Cultural Stereotypes

"Selfies are an interesting thing to study right now. Are they just a fad, or do they represent a substantial new trend of how we create and share photos? Are they a means of self-expression, a tool of self-promotion, or a cry for attention? And are there any cultural differences in the way people in different countries take selfies?"

We’d like to think that self-expression is the baseline. They can be used for so much more, based on what we’ve seen in the last few months of experimentation.

Selfies = building blocks.

The best — maybe the only? — real, direct measure of “innovation” is change in human behaviour. In fact, it is useful to take this way of thinking as definitional: innovation is the sum of change across the whole system, not a thing which causes a change in how people behave. No small innovation ever caused a large shift in how people spend their time and no large one has ever failed to do so.

We Don’t Sell Saddles Here — Medium

You know what’s so cool about Stewart? He’s the rare product visionary who’s genuinely a philosopher. He seriously considers and thinks through technology and business through the prism of human understanding. There’s not too many people like that in tech. There are growth hackers, marketers, mentors… but philosophers? We need more.

Compared with Wall Street or petroleum, Silicon Valley might need to spend a far greater share of its treasure to maintain a general faith in its good intentions. It might need to wade more deeply into politics, not to secure tax breaks for itself but to force the development of affordable housing and transit in the Bay Area and beyond, so its neighbors don’t lose when it wins.

Silicon Valley Needs to Lose the Arrogance or Risk Destruction

I see the best minds of my generation… wanting to be brogrammers.

Lots of good observations in the article.. certainly issues I struggle with as I grow in my thirties. I’d love to find common ground between tech, community, arts, social work, education, unions, City Hall, to grow San Francisco into an awesome city - one with vibrant civic life and a strong moral compass. But it’s a morass. And any dialogue I hear is bitter and divisive.

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