Transfering iPhone photos to a hard drive because I’ve maxed out my limit and found this old message for david from Curitiba. I <3 Brazil.

selfieim
selfieim:


O que o motivou a criar o Selfie? Queremos fornecer a nossos usuários um lugar no qual se sintam representados de maneira autêntica

(via "O ‘selfie’ é um idioma universal", diz criador do Selfie.im - Vida Digital - Notícia - VEJA.com)
Grateful and excited to talk about the whys, hows and what’s next for Selfie for our users in Brazil.  It was a pretty in-depth interview that puts a lot of our work for the last few months in perspective.

selfieim:

O que o motivou a criar o Selfie? Queremos fornecer a nossos usuários um lugar no qual se sintam representados de maneira autêntica

(via "O ‘selfie’ é um idioma universal", diz criador do Selfie.im - Vida Digital - Notícia - VEJA.com)

Grateful and excited to talk about the whys, hows and what’s next for Selfie for our users in Brazil.  It was a pretty in-depth interview that puts a lot of our work for the last few months in perspective.

The modest recovery seen in Brazil’s economy could be jeopardized by the marked slowdown being witnessed in China, Brazil’s biggest importer, market experts have said.

Rio Times Online - September 2012

Loss of Chinese consumers means Brazilian exports pile up, which means  the depreciation of value of the reais — which means the cost of living is harder on Brazilians — which means something like a little increase in bus fares is magnified and well… it’s hard to tell, but we live in a connected world where the slightest imbalance can tip us into the flames.

It is interesting to see emerging markets like Brazil and Turkey rise up for different social reasons, but the day to day hardships under governments that turn a blind eye on personal expression, equitable living standards and just governance are the same.  And while in the past economic hardships may bring a temporary spike in public protests, in the age of Facebook and Twitter, the levers of media control just aren’t as robust for governments to clamp down any longer.

The biggest danger in a capitalist/democratic society is that the middle class lose faith in their ability to progress to the upper classes — and that their slide into the lower class gives reality to the case of the 1% haves and the 99% have nots.  In the end, numbers win out and no amount of martial violence can keep the consciousness of millions of people under control.

We live in interesting times.

I am a female 39 years old lawyer. I have been there, downtown in Rio (20/06/2013), from 4:30 to 9:30 PM. There is no explanation for what is going on in Brazil. Yesterday we had about 1.4 mio people on the streets only in Rio (local media lie about the numbers - NY Times, ou should see with own eyes). There was no vandalism at all but when the people was already going home, the Gov. closed all subway stations and there was no public transportation within a radius of 20 km. The mobile thelephone lines and internet have been closed all the time. By the end of the manifest, when most people had gone and there was a small group dispersing towards the south of the city suddenly, the street lights went out. The police began to throw bombs and rubber bullet shots at random. We all turned the corrner and went to Rio Branco Av.(a great avenue that cross the protests avenue). What we’ve found there: more bombs coming from the beginning of Rio Branco avenue and all the side streets. Me and hundreds of people were trapped like rats in a shoebox, there was no exit, no way out. We had to run through the bullets and bombs using masks wet with vinegar. What media calls vandalism always start about 8:30 PM, behind the protest and noboy is able to come back to see. The folk already suspect that the “vandals” are people paid by the gov. to delegitimize the movement, because they always act, in all cities, at the same time and in the same manner; The police does not lead them to prison
quotingthecrisis
In Argentina and Brazil, as I show in the book, inequality started to decline almost immediately once the financiers were knocked off their thrones. In Brazil the share of income passing through the financial sector was extraordinarily large, but over the course of twelve years and three presidencies, it has gradually been reduced, making room for expanded public services, improved social conditions and reduced inequality.