The best — maybe the only? — real, direct measure of “innovation” is change in human behaviour. In fact, it is useful to take this way of thinking as definitional: innovation is the sum of change across the whole system, not a thing which causes a change in how people behave. No small innovation ever caused a large shift in how people spend their time and no large one has ever failed to do so.

We Don’t Sell Saddles Here — Medium

You know what’s so cool about Stewart? He’s the rare product visionary who’s genuinely a philosopher. He seriously considers and thinks through technology and business through the prism of human understanding. There’s not too many people like that in tech. There are growth hackers, marketers, mentors… but philosophers? We need more.

Paper plates battle by marssy on Flickr.

Fridays at Flickr were the best. That’s when all the energy from the week bubbles up and wacky silly shit started to happen. Now I think there’s the tradition of the Flickr Saloon. Before that.. a lot of shit was thrown around: nerd darts, stuff animals, beach balls… but then sometimes things get creative.

There was a bunch of leftover paper plates from a party… 

What do you think of the new Flickr photo page? I like the big image.
The dark theme is a bit like 500px or SmugSmug. Flickr was one of those places where the white background - if I remember correctly - elicited strong and philosophical opinions from the old-timers.
The design also reminds me of photo editing software like Lightroom. Which makes sense. The primacy is on the photo now versus context, mamby pamby concepts like stories, conversations, or moments. It feels very mechanical and functional versus the “Zoinks” and “Egads” of yesteryears. It’s more like a dashboard instead of a gallery, more tool than community.  Given Yahoo’s size, it makes sense to compete on storage and management of all your photos versus interactions (Instagram I think is the current leader here).
As an aside, when will visual design move past the tables and boxes of basic HTML? There are a lot we can learn from print and magazine layouts, now that we have the tools to translate that understanding into the proper digital language… anyways, I digress.
One of these days when I don’t have 5 billion projects, I want to write something called “Social networks are like relationships” or “The Flickr I used to Know” or something like that.
Flickr, a place to store your photos. Now with a terabyte. That’s pretty decent marketing.
Oh wait, this is on Flickr’s blog:

Flickr is a revolution in photo storage, sharing and organization, making photo management an easy, natural and collaborative process.

Seems like storage is the main priority.
Full disclosure: I was the product guy in charge of the design of Flickr’s photo page in 2010.  The mamby pamby ideas of photos as mini stories are mine, and sadly, I never got to see them realized in the larger Flickr ecosystem (photostream, activity feed, groups, sets, favorites, galleries, and more) before I was frustrated with Yahoo and moved to NYC and Tumblr. It’s been a few years now, and I wish the current team at Flickr well. Excited to see what comes ahead!
PS - I miss the map :(

What do you think of the new Flickr photo page? I like the big image.

The dark theme is a bit like 500px or SmugSmug. Flickr was one of those places where the white background - if I remember correctly - elicited strong and philosophical opinions from the old-timers.

The design also reminds me of photo editing software like Lightroom. Which makes sense. The primacy is on the photo now versus context, mamby pamby concepts like stories, conversations, or moments. It feels very mechanical and functional versus the “Zoinks” and “Egads” of yesteryears. It’s more like a dashboard instead of a gallery, more tool than community.  Given Yahoo’s size, it makes sense to compete on storage and management of all your photos versus interactions (Instagram I think is the current leader here).

As an aside, when will visual design move past the tables and boxes of basic HTML? There are a lot we can learn from print and magazine layouts, now that we have the tools to translate that understanding into the proper digital language… anyways, I digress.

One of these days when I don’t have 5 billion projects, I want to write something called “Social networks are like relationships” or “The Flickr I used to Know” or something like that.

Flickr, a place to store your photos. Now with a terabyte. That’s pretty decent marketing.

Oh wait, this is on Flickr’s blog:

Flickr is a revolution in photo storage, sharing and organization, making photo management an easy, natural and collaborative process.

Seems like storage is the main priority.

Full disclosure: I was the product guy in charge of the design of Flickr’s photo page in 2010.  The mamby pamby ideas of photos as mini stories are mine, and sadly, I never got to see them realized in the larger Flickr ecosystem (photostream, activity feed, groups, sets, favorites, galleries, and more) before I was frustrated with Yahoo and moved to NYC and Tumblr. It’s been a few years now, and I wish the current team at Flickr well. Excited to see what comes ahead!

PS - I miss the map :(

alexrainert

alexrainert:

Mat Honan:

And that’s the thing: Flickr feels like a permanent home. While sharing is great, it turns out that as we progress in our digital lives, as we take more and more photos and share them more and more places, we eventually want to go back and see them again. (Which explains the popularity of services like TimeHop.) We want to revisit them. We want to relive them.

This is a great insight. We take more and more photos but it seems like a lot of services are geared towards “share now!” vs reflection and coming back to the things we’ve done and getting some narrative out of them.

Coincidentally, these abstractions: stories, moments, reflection, images — they coincide (hehe) with everything that I’m interested in tech at the moment. It’s everything that i has informed my work at Flickr and at Tumblr. So.. stay tuned for more in this space ;)

EDIT: question: do we ‘really’ want to see all these mementos again? We create so much volume now and a simple economic rule of thumb is that the greater the supply, the lower the demand.

Flickr, codeswarming (by waferbaby)

Data viz of all engineering activity on Flickr since the beginning.

For those of us who worked there, this is such an awesome reminder of the drama of tech workerings (I just made up that word): the supernovas of shipping brilliant features, the implosions of the lean years, and the rebirths when immensely talented people add their own stamps onto the product.

Man, I miss the brilliant engineering culture we had at Flickr.

hithertodotnet

hithertodotnet:

Many too many words will be written about Facebook’s $1bn acquisition of Instagram today, but these are mine…

Congrats!

First up, hearty congratulations to the Instagram team. I’ve long held them as one of the most successful examples of a “minimum viable product” — there are many things…

As always, Simon gives a well thought out take on the tech news. But two bits: #1 - Doing “things the right way” often gives a free pass to stubborn product decisions that misses the forest for the trees and #2 - Facebook isn’t Yahoo and in some ways Flickr sold too soon, both elements that hampered the creativity to kickass (it took years to develop but there was a slow burn).

To do this, we are starting 2012 with a renewed sense of focus. This means discontinuing certain features that are not core to our product or that haven’t resonated with you. Since the upcoming new experiences will either require, or work significantly better, with modern browsers, we will also discontinue supporting some of the older browsers that only a very small percentage of people are using with Flickr.

Start the New Year Fresh! « Flickr Blog

Good. (It’s always hard to blog about your old companies. Like picking at scabs.) Curious to see what Flickr IS going to focus on.