Back

I travel, take photos, and build digital things.
I'm building SelfieIM. I curate Food & History.
I live in San Francisco, where the land ends.

11694.11d9b23.0c8970c56c644a48b7be62385205c07b

geo


Tourists vs Locals.



Blue points on the map are pictures taken by locals (people who have taken pictures in this city dated over a range of a month or more).
Red points are pictures taken by tourists (people who seem to be a local of a different city and who took pictures in this city for less than a month).



Full set on Flickr.  

Tourists vs Locals.

Blue points on the map are pictures taken by locals (people who have taken pictures in this city dated over a range of a month or more).

Red points are pictures taken by tourists (people who seem to be a local of a different city and who took pictures in this city for less than a month).

Full set on Flickr.  

San Francisco now is mapping its ‘urban trees’.  Why?

And yet, knowledge of the urban forest — where the trees are, what  species are represented, how old and healthy they are, the distribution  of trees geographically — has great value for planners, city foresters,  ecologists, landscape architects, tree advocacy groups, and residents,  too.
Our goal with the Urban Forest Map is to provide a one-stop  repository for tree data, welcoming information from any agency or group  and enabling and celebrating citizen participation. Together we’ll work  toward building a complete, dynamic picture of the urban forest.

Neat. I found 1,699 Japanese cherry trees in the city. About three are on my block.  I’m going to go and take some photos of them. And look - shapefiles!

San Francisco now is mapping its ‘urban trees’.  Why?

And yet, knowledge of the urban forest — where the trees are, what species are represented, how old and healthy they are, the distribution of trees geographically — has great value for planners, city foresters, ecologists, landscape architects, tree advocacy groups, and residents, too.

Our goal with the Urban Forest Map is to provide a one-stop repository for tree data, welcoming information from any agency or group and enabling and celebrating citizen participation. Together we’ll work toward building a complete, dynamic picture of the urban forest.

Neat. I found 1,699 Japanese cherry trees in the city. About three are on my block.  I’m going to go and take some photos of them. And look - shapefiles!

I want more things like Dolores Park, things that embrace the quiet rather than the firehose of ubiquitous broadcasting that is all the rage these days. I want maps like that. I want a map my neighbourhood, or a city I’m visiting, that is just the history of the places the people I know have been.