I have started to browse the NYTimes comments more and more. It’s a small but thriving community, and I have learned lots that add to my understanding of the articles. The socialness within the NYTimes is basic, there is no cross referencing or engagement outside of the articles, but there is depth of conversation. I do think the NYTimes is undervalued if they can unlock more of their nascent and invisible community, perhaps as a counterweight to the superficial communities on lesser quality media platforms. It may go away from their core knowledge of news reporting, but an interesting thought exercise nonetheless.
Update: Looks like I need to do more research (thanks jasonsmithtx) as the NYTimes is actively developing their comments platform:

The Times, which will commit up to six employees to the project, said that it had considered buying available software but concluded along with The Post that it would be easier to customize a platform built in-house. Such a platform would also allow the publisher to retain valuable user data instead of handing it to a third party.
Through the new platform, the news organizations said in a release, “Readers will be able to submit pictures, links and other media; track discussions; and manage their contributions and online identities.” The news outlets can then collect and use the reader content “for other forms of storytelling and to spark ongoing discussions.”

Admirable work!

I have started to browse the NYTimes comments more and more. It’s a small but thriving community, and I have learned lots that add to my understanding of the articles. The socialness within the NYTimes is basic, there is no cross referencing or engagement outside of the articles, but there is depth of conversation. I do think the NYTimes is undervalued if they can unlock more of their nascent and invisible community, perhaps as a counterweight to the superficial communities on lesser quality media platforms. It may go away from their core knowledge of news reporting, but an interesting thought exercise nonetheless.

Update: Looks like I need to do more research (thanks jasonsmithtx) as the NYTimes is actively developing their comments platform:

The Times, which will commit up to six employees to the project, said that it had considered buying available software but concluded along with The Post that it would be easier to customize a platform built in-house. Such a platform would also allow the publisher to retain valuable user data instead of handing it to a third party.

Through the new platform, the news organizations said in a release, “Readers will be able to submit pictures, links and other media; track discussions; and manage their contributions and online identities.” The news outlets can then collect and use the reader content “for other forms of storytelling and to spark ongoing discussions.”

Admirable work!

This is a problem much bigger than Facebook. It reminded me of what can go wrong in society, and why we now often talk at each other instead of to each other.

I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me.

The heart of why I’m still working in tech: to change this.  Mat’s piece is great not only for the content, but his writer’s voice is a more benign version of what goes on in my head as I scroll through stream after stream of content each day (a much more benign version)

Also - masterful SEO troll for the title of the piece. Mat’s been rolling for his last two articles.

Hoffman thought about it for a second, and then talked about how Capote was 35 when he started reporting the story that became In Cold Blood, and how there comes a time in every man’s life, around your mid-thirties, when you start to ask yourself, Have I done the great thing I was supposed to do? Am I ever going to do it?

Philip Seymour Hoffman: 1967-2014 «

This is me every Monday morning, as I turn 35 in a few months.

selfieim
selfieim:

OMG - is this the article to end all articles about selfies? We thought we were on top of what selfies meant, but NY Mag sure did their research. It’s LONG, and it traverses history, art, psychology, futurism, tech, and more:

Everyone has their own idea of what makes a good selfie. I like the ones that metamorphose into what might be called selfies-plus—pictures that begin to speak in unintended tongues, that carry surpluses of meaning that the maker may not have known were there. Barthes wrote that such images produce what he called “a third meaning,” which passes “from language to significance.”
Art at Arms Length: A History of the Selfie (NY Mag)

selfieim:

OMG - is this the article to end all articles about selfies? We thought we were on top of what selfies meant, but NY Mag sure did their research. It’s LONG, and it traverses history, art, psychology, futurism, tech, and more:

Everyone has their own idea of what makes a good selfie. I like the ones that metamorphose into what might be called selfies-plus—pictures that begin to speak in unintended tongues, that carry surpluses of meaning that the maker may not have known were there. Barthes wrote that such images produce what he called “a third meaning,” which passes “from language to significance.”

Art at Arms Length: A History of the Selfie (NY Mag)

In Turkey as elsewhere in the Middle East, the explosion of Internet-based media outlets has surpassed the ability of the government to control information completely. When Nazli Ilicak, a longtime journalist here, lost her job recently at the pro-government newspaper Sabah after emerging as a strong voice against the government’s handling of the corruption inquiry, she said she would simply keep up her criticism on Twitter and on independent websites. “I have 500,000 followers,” she said in a recent television appearance. “That’s more than Sabah’s circulation.”
imagistlabs
imagistapp:

Announcing: Selfie 1.0
San Francisco - Today Imagist Labs, Inc. announced the release of what is the culmination of hours of research and development: The Selfie Network, a front-facing only camera app.
For full details, the press release is in our permanent collection.

THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER BUILT GAIS.

imagistapp:

Announcing: Selfie 1.0

San Francisco - Today Imagist Labs, Inc. announced the release of what is the culmination of hours of research and development: The Selfie Network, a front-facing only camera app.

For full details, the press release is in our permanent collection.

THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER BUILT GAIS.

newyorker
newyorker:

Wendell Steavenson on Tahrir Square’s military coup: http://nyr.kr/16P8fB1

"Waving flags and tooting whistles, trumpeting vuvuzelas, drumming and shouting and chanting and honking and singing—Tahrir reached such a noisy level of jubilation that people were joking, “Did Egypt win the World Cup?” Walking among them, dodging fireworks, it felt upside down: a popular protest to oust President Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood leader who was democratically elected, in which, since Monday, the military has taken the side of the protesters."



Photograph by Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty.



Great “of the moment” impressions re Egypts coupvolution.

newyorker:

Wendell Steavenson on Tahrir Square’s military coup: http://nyr.kr/16P8fB1

"Waving flags and tooting whistles, trumpeting vuvuzelas, drumming and shouting and chanting and honking and singing—Tahrir reached such a noisy level of jubilation that people were joking, “Did Egypt win the World Cup?” Walking among them, dodging fireworks, it felt upside down: a popular protest to oust President Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood leader who was democratically elected, in which, since Monday, the military has taken the side of the protesters."

Photograph by Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty.

Great “of the moment” impressions re Egypts coupvolution.