This is a problem much bigger than Facebook. It reminded me of what can go wrong in society, and why we now often talk at each other instead of to each other.

I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me.

The heart of why I’m still working in tech: to change this.  Mat’s piece is great not only for the content, but his writer’s voice is a more benign version of what goes on in my head as I scroll through stream after stream of content each day (a much more benign version)

Also - masterful SEO troll for the title of the piece. Mat’s been rolling for his last two articles.

Hoffman thought about it for a second, and then talked about how Capote was 35 when he started reporting the story that became In Cold Blood, and how there comes a time in every man’s life, around your mid-thirties, when you start to ask yourself, Have I done the great thing I was supposed to do? Am I ever going to do it?

Philip Seymour Hoffman: 1967-2014 «

This is me every Monday morning, as I turn 35 in a few months.

selfieim
selfieim:

OMG - is this the article to end all articles about selfies? We thought we were on top of what selfies meant, but NY Mag sure did their research. It’s LONG, and it traverses history, art, psychology, futurism, tech, and more:

Everyone has their own idea of what makes a good selfie. I like the ones that metamorphose into what might be called selfies-plus—pictures that begin to speak in unintended tongues, that carry surpluses of meaning that the maker may not have known were there. Barthes wrote that such images produce what he called “a third meaning,” which passes “from language to significance.”
Art at Arms Length: A History of the Selfie (NY Mag)

selfieim:

OMG - is this the article to end all articles about selfies? We thought we were on top of what selfies meant, but NY Mag sure did their research. It’s LONG, and it traverses history, art, psychology, futurism, tech, and more:

Everyone has their own idea of what makes a good selfie. I like the ones that metamorphose into what might be called selfies-plus—pictures that begin to speak in unintended tongues, that carry surpluses of meaning that the maker may not have known were there. Barthes wrote that such images produce what he called “a third meaning,” which passes “from language to significance.”

Art at Arms Length: A History of the Selfie (NY Mag)

In Turkey as elsewhere in the Middle East, the explosion of Internet-based media outlets has surpassed the ability of the government to control information completely. When Nazli Ilicak, a longtime journalist here, lost her job recently at the pro-government newspaper Sabah after emerging as a strong voice against the government’s handling of the corruption inquiry, she said she would simply keep up her criticism on Twitter and on independent websites. “I have 500,000 followers,” she said in a recent television appearance. “That’s more than Sabah’s circulation.”
imagistlabs
imagistapp:

Announcing: Selfie 1.0
San Francisco - Today Imagist Labs, Inc. announced the release of what is the culmination of hours of research and development: The Selfie Network, a front-facing only camera app.
For full details, the press release is in our permanent collection.

THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER BUILT GAIS.

imagistapp:

Announcing: Selfie 1.0

San Francisco - Today Imagist Labs, Inc. announced the release of what is the culmination of hours of research and development: The Selfie Network, a front-facing only camera app.

For full details, the press release is in our permanent collection.

THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER BUILT GAIS.

newyorker
newyorker:

Wendell Steavenson on Tahrir Square’s military coup: http://nyr.kr/16P8fB1

"Waving flags and tooting whistles, trumpeting vuvuzelas, drumming and shouting and chanting and honking and singing—Tahrir reached such a noisy level of jubilation that people were joking, “Did Egypt win the World Cup?” Walking among them, dodging fireworks, it felt upside down: a popular protest to oust President Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood leader who was democratically elected, in which, since Monday, the military has taken the side of the protesters."



Photograph by Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty.



Great “of the moment” impressions re Egypts coupvolution.

newyorker:

Wendell Steavenson on Tahrir Square’s military coup: http://nyr.kr/16P8fB1

"Waving flags and tooting whistles, trumpeting vuvuzelas, drumming and shouting and chanting and honking and singing—Tahrir reached such a noisy level of jubilation that people were joking, “Did Egypt win the World Cup?” Walking among them, dodging fireworks, it felt upside down: a popular protest to oust President Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood leader who was democratically elected, in which, since Monday, the military has taken the side of the protesters."

Photograph by Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty.

Great “of the moment” impressions re Egypts coupvolution.

It was good, Storyboard

image

Jessica in the middle of one of her interviews with a Tumblr creator. 

I’ve always wanted to be a journalist - and after middle school daydreams and college writing courses and a brief stint as a wannabe travel writer in 2006, I realized what a tough business it was and quit. 

But my love for the craft of long-form journalism stuck, and in the last year, the rise of editorial teams within large tech platforms heralded a possible new age where original content and user-generated content could have co-existed. Twitter Stories, Facebook Stories and Tumblr Storyboard all tried to mine what their communities were doing.

Except Tumblr was different. More than just a mouthpiece that relayed how these platforms made users lives better, Storyboard had bonafide journalistic credentials: they were reporting on what people were doing creatively and were not just marketing case studies.

And Storyboard exemplified — perhaps in a vaccum of 2012 — how Tumblr thought of itself: not just as a technology platform, not just a user-generated content community, but in interviews and logo design and pitches and blog posts, as a place for creators.  Tumblr always aspired to be the intersection between tech and liberal arts, using a well-designed technological foundation to spur humanity’s creative output.  It’s that ambitious. It’s one of the reasons I loved being part of the team. More than just a platform for self-expression, Tumblr wanted to be a platform for creativity.

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