When I worked at Tumblr in the early days, we used to take meetings by walking around the block, getting coffee or tea. As the company grew bigger, meetings meant being in conference rooms.  
Now at my tiny startup, I find that taking active meetings helps Alaric and I whenever we have hard problems to solve.  We invented this game that we’re both terrible at: soccer tennis.  On certain Fridays, we take our co-founder meetings by kicking a soccer ball back and forth over a tennis net.  It helps our brains get creative when our bodies are more active.  Plus, it’s a lot of fun and works a lot of my core.
There are no real rules except that you have to use your feet and you have to not let the soccer ball stop moving. 
We keep having to tell the tennis players that ‘yes, we are playing a real game’. Meetings - necessary - but they can be fun!

When I worked at Tumblr in the early days, we used to take meetings by walking around the block, getting coffee or tea. As the company grew bigger, meetings meant being in conference rooms.  

Now at my tiny startup, I find that taking active meetings helps Alaric and I whenever we have hard problems to solve.  We invented this game that we’re both terrible at: soccer tennis.  On certain Fridays, we take our co-founder meetings by kicking a soccer ball back and forth over a tennis net.  It helps our brains get creative when our bodies are more active.  Plus, it’s a lot of fun and works a lot of my core.

There are no real rules except that you have to use your feet and you have to not let the soccer ball stop moving. 

We keep having to tell the tennis players that ‘yes, we are playing a real game’. Meetings - necessary - but they can be fun!

timoni
timoni:

The Ping-Pong Theory of Tech Sexism, by Ariel Schrag.
This interview is the best reflection I’ve read of how I feel being a woman in the tech industry. I get more respect than a lot of my female coworkers, being on the product side and somewhat technically aware, but I don’t get guy-level respect. My ideas are routinely ignored, or ascribed to other male coworkers.
I know my coworkers aren’t consciously doing this. Calling them out on it is, for the most part, pointless: it will be seen as irrational, overly sensitive, or aggressive. And yet, when I talk to other women, we do generally feel like our expertise isn’t valued, that we have to justify our arguments beyond reason, and that our challenges are simply ignored. It may not be sexism: we may really all just be worse at our jobs. But I doubt it.
So I like the approach this interview takes. No judgements, no sense that men are consciously to blame, just a clear, honest description of how things have been for this particular women during her career.
Addendum: After some reflection, I realized that these experiences aren’t true of my design colleagues; I’ve had uniformly great working experiences with all of them, male or female.

timoni:

The Ping-Pong Theory of Tech Sexism, by Ariel Schrag.

This interview is the best reflection I’ve read of how I feel being a woman in the tech industry. I get more respect than a lot of my female coworkers, being on the product side and somewhat technically aware, but I don’t get guy-level respect. My ideas are routinely ignored, or ascribed to other male coworkers.

I know my coworkers aren’t consciously doing this. Calling them out on it is, for the most part, pointless: it will be seen as irrational, overly sensitive, or aggressive. And yet, when I talk to other women, we do generally feel like our expertise isn’t valued, that we have to justify our arguments beyond reason, and that our challenges are simply ignored. It may not be sexism: we may really all just be worse at our jobs. But I doubt it.

So I like the approach this interview takes. No judgements, no sense that men are consciously to blame, just a clear, honest description of how things have been for this particular women during her career.

Addendum: After some reflection, I realized that these experiences aren’t true of my design colleagues; I’ve had uniformly great working experiences with all of them, male or female.

selfieim
It would be easy to slip into seeing the instantly shared photographic self-portrait, along with snaps of things bought and consumed, as a register of a complete surrender to commercial image culture: the preening necessary to emulate commodified beauty ideals, the apeing of celebrities, the internalising of values of professional self-presentation, the erasure of experience and memory through an obsession with moment-to-moment recording, and the distribution of the results on websites that mine images and metadata for commercial value. Yet the daily practice of photography gives people detailed knowledge about the way standard images of beauty and fame are produced; they learn considerable sophistication in the making of images and scepticism about their effects. The artifice of commercial imagery is understood through practical emulation. Most selfies are pastiche and many tip into parody. With this increase in awareness potentially comes a shift in power: from the paparazzi to their prey; and from the uncles, corporate and otherwise, to their nieces and nephews.

Hell yes, this is one of the best, real, realest write-ups of the crazy startup ride you’d go through as a founder - by someone who clearly knows a whole lot about curiosity, experimentation, failure, and aha moments. Penn represent!