From the hard drive: traveling by river in Burma is like going back in time.

foodandhistory
foodandhistory:

Momo // Familiar to lovers of Japanese gyozas and Chinese dumplings, momos have unique flavors coming from the types of meat fillings and spices that are ubiquitous to Nepal, Tibet and the Himalayan regions of Northern India.
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I have a new blog to share my love of travel, history and food. I haven’t found a place online that talk about the origins of the things we eat, yet.
The more we know about where these foods came from, the more we can appreciate the diversity in the world and the common bonds we all share.
If you have suggestions for me to research, let me know!

foodandhistory:

Momo // Familiar to lovers of Japanese gyozas and Chinese dumplings, momos have unique flavors coming from the types of meat fillings and spices that are ubiquitous to Nepal, Tibet and the Himalayan regions of Northern India.

Read More

I have a new blog to share my love of travel, history and food. I haven’t found a place online that talk about the origins of the things we eat, yet.

The more we know about where these foods came from, the more we can appreciate the diversity in the world and the common bonds we all share.

If you have suggestions for me to research, let me know!

explore-blog

I’ve travelled every way possible, and I’ve learned you need only two things (besides good health): some time and money.

[…]

Here is what I learned from 40 years of traveling: Of the two modes, it is far better to have more time than money.

When you have abundant time you can get closer to core of a place. You can hang around and see what really happens. You can meet a wider variety of people. You can slow down until the hour that the secret vault is opened. You have enough time to learn some new words, to understand what the real prices are, to wait out the weather, to get to that place that takes a week in a jeep.

Money is an attempt to buy time, but it rarely is able to buy any of the above.